July – National Cell Phone Courtesy Month – Week 2

July 11, 2019

While cell phones are important tools in emergency situations, with the amount of people using cell phones in the United States, some courtesy is in order. This week, we will outline the rules for using cell phones at work, compliments of Dawn Rosenberg McKay at about. com.

Rules for using cell phones at work

Having your cell phone at work can be useful but it can also be very disruptive. Your friends and family can reach you anytime, anywhere, which can be annoying. When you’re on your own time, the choice to turn off your cell phone is entirely yours. When it comes to using your cell phone at work, however, you have to be mindful of your co-workers and your boss, not to mention your own ability to get your job done. Here are some rules you should follow if you have your cell phone at work.

1. Turn your cell phone ringer off. If you have your cell phone at work, it shouldn’t ring. If you don’t want to turn off your cell phone completely, at least set it to vibrate. The sounds of different ring tones going off all the time can be very annoying to others. In addition, you don’t want your boss to know how often you get calls.

2. Use your cell phone only for important calls. If you have your cell phone at work, you should only use it for important calls. What should you classify as an important call? The school nurse calling to say your child is ill, your child calling to say he’s arrived home from school safely, and family emergencies that you must deal with immediately are important. Your friend calling to chat, your child calling to say the dog had an accident, or your mom calling to tell you a relative just got engaged should not be considered important.

3. Let your cell phone calls go to voicemail. While you are at work if you are in doubt about whether an incoming call is important, let voice mail pick it up. It will take much less time to check your messages than it will to answer the call and then tell the caller you can’t talk.

Next week: Continuation and cell phones in worship

General Disclaimer: The writer has used her best efforts in preparation of this information. No representations or warranties for its contents, either expressed or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall be liable in any way for readers’ efforts to apply, rely or utilize the information or recommendations presented herein as they may not be suitable for you or necessarily appropriate for every situation to which they may refer. This information is for educational purposes only. If you would like to contact Rev. Lester, write to her c/o P.O. Box 121, Brookfield, WI. 53008.