Aging in place: Growing old at home (part 2 of 2)

June 13, 2019

As we age, we and our loved ones are faced with challenges that can make the most simple of everyday tasks more difficult. But many long to stay in the homes that they have known all their lives. In this half of our two-part series we look at those concerned about staying in our homes as we age as well as where we can look for assistance to do so.

Aging in place:
Common concerns

If staying in your home is important to you, you may still have concerns about safety, getting around, or other activities of daily life. Find suggestions below to help you think about some of these worries.

• Getting around—at home and in town. Are you having trouble walking? Perhaps a walker would help. If you need more, think about getting an electric chair or scooter. These are sometimes covered by Medicare. Do you need someone to go with you to the doctor or shopping? Volunteer escort services may be available. If you are no longer driving a car, find out if there are free or low-cost public transportation and taxis in your area. Maybe a relative, friend, or neighbor would take you along when they go on errands or do yours for you. To learn about resources in your community, contact Eldercare Locator at 1-800-677-1116 (toll-free) or https://eldercare.acl.gov.

• Activities and friends. Are you bored staying at home? Your local senior center offers a variety of activities. You might see friends there and meet new people, too. Is it hard for you to leave your home? Maybe you would enjoy visits from someone. Volunteers are sometimes available to stop by or call once a week. They can just keep you company, or you can talk about any problems you are having. Call your local Area Agency on Aging to see if they are available near you.

• Safety. Are you worried about crime in your neighborhood, physical abuse, or losing money as a result of a scam? Talk to the staff at your local Area Agency on Aging. If you live alone, are you afraid of becoming sick with no one around to help? You might want to get an emergency alert system. You just push a special button that you wear, and emergency medical personnel are called. There is typically a monthly fee for this service.

• Housing. Would a few changes make your home easier and safer to live in? Think about things like a ramp at the front door, grab bars in the tub or shower, nonskid floors, more comfortable handles on doors or faucets, and better insulation. Sound expensive? You might be able to get help paying for these changes. Check with your local Area Agency on Aging, state housing finance agency, welfare department, community development groups, or the federal government.

Help during the day. Do you need care but live with someone who can’t stay with you during the day? For example, maybe they work. Adult day care outside the home is sometimes available for older people who need help caring for themselves. The day care center can pick you up and bring you home. If your caretaker needs to get away overnight, there are places that provide temporary respite care.

Where can I look for help staying at home?

Here are some resources to start with:

1 .People you know. Family, friends, and neighbors are the biggest source of help for many older people. Talk with those close to you about the best way to get what you need. If you are physically able, think about trading services with a friend or neighbor. One could do the grocery shopping, and the other could cook dinner, for example.

2. Community and local government resources. Learn about the services in your community. Healthcare providers and social workers may have suggestions. The local Area Agency on Aging, local and state offices on aging or social services, and your tribal organization may have lists of services. If you belong to a religious group, talk with the clergy, or check with its local office about any senior services they offer.

3. Geriatric care managers. These specially trained professionals can help find resources to make your daily life easier. They will work with you to form a longterm care plan and find the services you need. Geriatric care managers can be helpful when family members live far apart. Learn more about geriatric care managers.

4. Federal government sources. The federal government offers many resources for seniors. Longtermcare.gov, from the Administration for Community Living, is a good place to start.

How much will it cost to get help at home?

An important part of planning is thinking about how you are going to pay for the help you need. Some things you want may cost a lot. Others may be free. Some might be covered by Medicare or other health insurance. Some may not. Check with your insurance provider(s). It’s possible that paying for a few services out of pocket could cost less than moving into an independent living, assisted living, or long-term care facility. And you will have your wish of still living on your own. Resources like Benefits.gov and BenefitsCheckUp® can help you find out about possible benefits you might qualify for.

Are you eligible for benefits from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)? The VA sometimes provides medical care in your home. In some areas, they offer homemaker/ home health aide services, adult day health care, and hospice. To learn more, visit www.va.gov, call the VA Health Care Benefits number, 1-877-222-8387 (toll-free), or contact the VA medical center nearest you.

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