National Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Month (Week 1)

May 30, 2019

The Counseling Corner

By Rev. Judith T. Lester, B.Min. M.Th

June is National Fresh Fruits and Vegetables Month. The history of National Fresh Fruits and Vegetables month is unclear; what is clear is that this observance has been occurring since 1991 to promote the growing and grilling season. This month, this column will highlight the advantages of fresh fruits and vegetables and encourage you to bump up fruits and vegetables on your plate. There are many ways to celebrate National Fruits and Vegetables Month. Here are some suggestions: 1. Visit the fresh fruits and vegetables aisle at your favorite grocer and load up. Don’t be afraid to try a different fruit and/or vegetable each week. If you buy canned or frozen vegetables and fruit, be sure to compare food labels and choose the products with the lowest amounts of sodium and added sugars. 2. Visit your local farmers markets. 3. Plant your own fruit and vegetable garden and grow what you eat and eat what you grow. 4. Look for recipes that increases the fruits and vegetables on your plate. 5. Sneak in more colorful, nutritious fruits and vegetables into your snacks, meals and even breakfast. If you are already eating fruits and vegetables regularly, the American Heart Association recommends going to the next level and include more color. Fruits and vegetables include vitamins minerals and other nutrients such as fiber, potassium, folate and Vitamin A and C. The best way to get all of the vitamins, minerals and nutrients you need is to eat a variety of colorful fruits and veggies. Add color to your plate each day with the five main color groups. A condensed version of the list provided by the American Heart Association is included here. For the complete list, go to heart.org/addcolor.

Red & Pink
Beets
Cherries
Cranberries
Pink grapefruit
Pomegranates
Red radishes
Red apples
Red grapes
Red peppers
Red potatoes
Rhubarbs
Strawberries
Tomatoes
Watermelons

Blue/Purple
Blackberries
Blueberries
Black currants
Dates
Eggplants
Grapes
Plums
Prunes
Purple figs
Raisins

White
Bananas
Cauliflower
Garlic
Jerusalem artichokes
Mushrooms
Onions
Potatoes
Parsnips
Shallots

Yellow & Orange
Acorn squash
Butternut squash
Apricots
Cantaloupes
Carrots
Corn
Grapefruit
Lemons
Mangoes
Nectarines
Oranges

Green
Artichokes
Asparagus
Avocados
Bok choy
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Celery
Collard greens
Cucumbers
Green beans
Green cabbage

Next Week: Continuation

General Disclaimer: The writer has used her best efforts in preparation of this information. No representations or warranties for its contents, either expressed or implied, are offered. Neither the publisher nor the writer shall be liable in any way for readers’ efforts to apply, rely or utilize the information or recommendations presented herein as they may not be suitable for you or necessarily appropriate for every situation to which they may refer. This information is for educational purposes only. If you would like to contact Rev. Lester, write to her c/o P.O. Box 121, Brookfield, WI. 53008.